EXERCISEºRECREATIONºSPORT


SCIENCE AT THE STAKE

by Roy W. Smith published in 1946
Page 32


HOW TO BUILD AND LIGHT HORSESHOE COURTS

   Courts should always be installed with north and south view, to obtain the best diffusion of light and relief from eye strain, caused by sun glare, in following of the shoes. See Rules 1, 2, 3, and 4 for directions on how to build a Horseshoe Court.

   The most successfully lighted courts are those illuminated with 100-watt lamps and large, deep reflectors, hung 14 or 16 feet above the court, just in front of the foul lines. This does not cast shadows, and eliminates the glare of light in following the flight of the shoes.

SUGGESTED METHOD OF ANCHORING STAKES

   Use a one-inch round steel stake 28" to 32" long. In a block 10 x 10 x 16 inches bore a 15/16" hole 7 inches deep at an angle of 3 inches to the foot, drive the stake into the hole until it reaches th1 1/8" hole drilled in the center, can then be slipped over the stake and secured to the block. This plate serves to hold the stake firmly and prevents it from becoming loose in the block. This omethod eliminates the use of cross-arms. Block can be treated to prevent decay. Setting the stakes in concrete is another excellent method. The stake may be set perpendicular in the block and the required 3" lean, (for 12" stake), given when the block is set in the ground. If stakes are to be driven into the ground for a temporary court, they should be from 36" to 42" long.

   Old bed rails and automobile tires serve as excellent protection when fastened to the front cross-piece of the pitcher's box. Backstops, 16" to 20" in height, may be constructed of heavy planks to hold the soil in the pitching box. If procurable, Clay is the best soil to use in the boxes.

CONDITION AND CARE OF COURTS AND EQUIPMENT

   The courts should be kept neat and clean with the pitching boxes filled to proper level. When possible, they should be constructed in clean and pleasant surroundings. The ground should be as level and spacious as possible; the players should not be cramped for room and the spectators should be able to watch the game in safety and comfort. Playgrounds kept up in this order are always popular and not only serve to stimulate and hold the interest of the players, but enable them to do full justice to their game.

   While many courts rival a flower garden in beauty, others, if they may be called courts, resemble a city dumping ground. The

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