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1974 World Tournament
Keene, N.H. - July 27-Aug 4, 1974

Permission granted by author, Gary T. Kline of
"The Official N.H.P.A. History of the World Tournament 1909-1980", Reflection Press, Dayton, Ohio
Gary T. Kline's book on past world tournament (before 1980) is recommended reading for any horseshoe pitching enthusiast. With his kind permission, we bring excerpts from his fabulous collection of data, to wit:

1974 World Tournament

For the third time in less than a decade this popular Eastern site was chosen to be tournament host. Since 1965, only Hohl, Kuchcinski, or Day had been able to win the title. Steinfeldt, Martin and Seibold were constant threats, but had always fallen just short in attempting to break this trio's stranglehold. Elmer Hohl, now trying to win his third straight World Title, had a history of spectacular pitching, especially at Keene, and loomed as the man to beat.

The rookie crop was a fine one. Ron Jinkerson would be the fifth Canadian to ever make the field. Ron Prue, the third person to represent Massachusetts, would enjoy the horseshoe pitching thrill of his life. Ron, a non-star, realized the dream of every good, but not great, pitcher of being on the same courts with the living legends. Any victory would just be frosting on the cake. Mark Freeman, also in his only appearance, was in much the same category. State Champion Al Lord became Maine's first pitcher since 1923 to make this field and would return in the future.

Paul Day, the son of Curt, was an excellent pitcher while in the Junior Division, finishing runner up to Seibold a few years prior. Paul would have a fine showing, but wisely would not let horseshoe pitching supercede his pursuit of higher learning. Gary Roberts, the seventh highest qualifier, was making his initial appearance. Gary, as a Junior, won four World Championships, a record that may never be broken! He also pitched the full distance of 40 feet then, and was the cause of Ohio passing a rule that a Junior competitor could not also pitch in the Men's Division at the State event. Joe Schultz, a future State Champion, was just beginning his journey to the all time Top 100.

After seven games only Curt Day was undefeated. Deadlocked at 6-1 were Focht, Knisley, Kabel, Zadroga, Martin, Steinfeldt, and Hohl. Those tied at 5-2 were Killgore, Stinson, Henton, and Seibold. Killgore was dumped by Curt Day, 52-25 and Stinson, 52-28. Stinson fell to Steinfeldt, 50-35 and Seibold, 50-41. Henton was bopped by Martin, 5024 and Lord, 50-.33. Seibold fell to Focht, 50-42 in 128 shoes and later to Martin, 50-30. Focht went down to Henton, 54-47 in 126 shoes. Knisley succumbed to Focht, 50-44. Zadroga was tripped by Seibold, 51-38. Kabel was axed by Maison, 51-22. Martin was topped by Hohl, 50-36. Defending World Champion Hohl was mastered by Zadroga, 52-31. In perhaps the best spectator match, in the battle of New Yorkers, Stockholm edged Steinfeldt, 50-49 in 124 shoes. There were quite a few newsworthy matches. Rademacher edged Bruce, 50-48 in 124 shoes.

Maison died in the king row three times: 51-45 to Henton in 128 shoes, 55-46 to Solomon, and 51-45 to Lord. Zadroga (90.0 percent) smothered Freeman, 50-3 and smashed Copeland, 51-14 with 92.9 percent.

After 14 games the pretenders had begun to fall by the wayside. Curt Day was still leader at 13-1. Bunched at 12-2 were Stinson, Martin, Hohl, and Steinfeldt. Alone at 11-3 was Kabel. Knotted at 10-4 were Focht, Knisley, Stockholm, Tyson, Henton, and Seibold. Zadroga had now lost six times, and the closest being to Stinson, 50-44 in 126 shoes. Focht was trampled by Hohl (93.1 percent) and Tyson (92.6 percent), each by a 51-7 score. Paul was upset by Paul Day, 55-44 in 124 shoes. Knisley in a bad streak was toppled by Rioux, 51-40; Maison, 50-31; and Steinfeldt, 50-28. Stockholm lost only to Zadroga, 50-23. Tyson lost only to Stockholm, 52-43. Henton lost two straight heartbreakers: 52-48 to Tyson and 52-49 to Vogel. Seibold bowed to Maison, 50-38 and was massacred by Hohl (93.5 percent), 52-13. Kabel went down to Steinfeldt, 52-46 and the upstart Tyson, 51-35. Stinson's only close scare was in a 50-44 squeaker over Zadroga in 126 shoes. Frank now had the longest winning streak at nine games. Ray Martin (81.5 percent) was taken by giant killer Stockholm, 51-39. Alan was looking the giants dead in the eye and responding well. He and Steinfeldt each pitched 84.7 percent in that classic and now he hit Martin with 85.2 percent. In one of the greatest games of all time, Rioux (85.5 percent) out gunned the legendary Elmer Hohl (85.1 percent), 51-48 in 148 shoes! The elated Rioux was practically walking on air in his most memorable triumph. In game nine, Curt Day was nipped by Seibold, 51-47. Other interesting matches also occurred. Roberts (89.4 percent) throttled Rademacher, 51-14. Black upset Bruce, 51-34 and Martz, 5144. Jinkerson won his first, 50-19, over Prue. Riffle nailed Kuchcinski, 50-29. Maison beat Kuchcinski, 50-42; Seibold, 50-38; and Knisley, 5031, all in a row for quite a feat. Paul Day (86.9 percent) beat Bruce (82.3), 52-32 in 130 shoes. Seibold defeated Paul Day, 51-31 in 136 shoes.

After 21 games the contenders had realistically dwindled to five. The leader was still Day at 20-1. Alone at 19-2 was Steinfeldt. Tied at 18-3 were Martin and Hohl. At 17-4 was Stinson. Seibold became an also ran by being upset by Roberts, 50-44. The same for Stockholm as he lost to Stinson, 50-45. Paglarini upset Kuchcinski, 50-43. Schultz upset Maddox, 55-43. Kuchcinski and Maddox battled for 134 shoes with Ralph winning, 51-44. Norwood struck down Henton, 52-47 and Focht, 50-41. Stinson took Focht, 53-40 in 124 shoes. Steinfeldt (87.7 percent) whipped Henton (83.1 percent), 51-31 in 130 shoes. Stinson had his 10 game winning streak ended by Riffle, 51-26. Frank lost his next game to Tyson, 52-44. Martin was felled by Stinson, 51-38. Ray (92.8 per-cent) earlier hammered Knisley, 52-16 and beat Focht, 52-35 in 130 shoes. In a tremendous classic, Hohl (87.0 percent) was upset by rookie Paul Day, 54-45 in 138 shoes as the youngster tossed an unbelievable 89.1 percent! Curt Day came from behind to fight off the upset bid of Schultz, 53-48, due to Joe's double miss on the last pitch. Hohl (92.2 percent) punished Copeland, 51-25 and Freeman, 51-7 with 91.7 percent.

After 28 games Day (27-1) opened up a three game lead on Steinfeldt and Hohl, each 24-4. Curt (90.7 percent) hammered Henton, 50-11. Hohl was upset by Stinson 50-38. Carl, on a 15 game winning streak, was beaten by Elmer, 52-35 and surprised by Vogel, 52-37. Elmer (94.6 percent) blasted Vogel, 53-6. Elmer (90.8 percent) handled Bruce, 51-19 and stomped Knisley, 50-12. with 91.3 percent. Martin was derailed by Steinfeldt, 53-27 and Curt Day, 50-45. Ray later pitched 90 percent on Over. Seibold defeated Henton, 52-42 in 122 shoes. Stockholm beat Knisley, 52-44 in 126 shoes. Earlier Knisley gave Seibold the worst beating of his career, a 51-3 whacking on the strength of a 95.8 percent.

In game 29, Steinfeldt wallop~d Curt Day, 52-23 and ended all ideas of a cakewalk. In game 30, Stinson was eliminated. In game 31, all the contenders breezed. In game 32, Paglarini had the thrill of beating Focht, 52-49. In game 33, Martin was eliminated by Maison in a 51-21 shocker. Glenn Rime, always unpredictable, crippled the chances of Steinfeldt with an easy 52-27 win. Another Ohioan, Kabel, knocked off Day, 50-45. This placed Curt in a one game lead over Hohl, but yet to face Elmer. In game 34, Henton outfought Kuchcinski, 52-43 in 124 shoes.

In the big game, Hohl and Day met in the most crucial match of the tournament. This match was like the early tournaments of the '20's when E. C. Beach would have only the contenders on the courts. The other pitchers of 1974 either finished early or temporarily postponed their matches to give this game undivided attention. Many sat in the empty scorekeeper's chairs to get a bird's-eye view of these two great legends!

In this epic showdown which went 132 shoes, Elmer pitched 110 ringers for 83.3 percent only to lose! Curt tossed 113 for 85.6 percent to win, 51-42. This game became quite a battle after play was temporarily halted to admonish a fan who kept opening and closing an umbrella directly behind the stake during the early stages of this tense confrontation. Elmer, for the tournament, averaged 85.4 percent, higher than anyone else, and lost twice while pitching over 85 percent! In game 35, Elmer dropped to third place after being upset by Maddox, 51-33. Maddox was the high qualifier and finished 21st, the lowest finish for a top qualifier in World Tournament history! Paul Focht capped the worst day in his great career with 35.3 percent in only 34 shoes as Rime took advantage with a 52-13 victory.

Curt Day, one of the greatest World Champions to ever step on the courts had now won his third World Title, becoming the seventh man in World Tournament history to accomplish this feat. This was the 12th straight World in which Curt had pitched over 80 percent. This was also the second time that Curt had won after missing the tournament the prior year. The only other man in history to accomplish this was Frank Jackson, while Fernando Isais, John Monasmith, C. C. Davis, Guy Zimmerman, and George May did it once.

Note: Since rookie Curt Over withdrew after 32 games which means all his matches were forfeited, we will as in past meets count each individual's match with Over as a victory as the game by game results occur.


1974 World Tournament Keene, N.H. - July 27-Aug 4, 1974
QualW.L.R.Sp.Pet.
1. Curt Day Frankfort, Ind. 535 32 3 2386 2842 81.8
2. Carl Steinfeldt Rochester, N.Y. 519 30 5 2363 2934 80.5
3. Elmer Hohl Wellesley, Ont., Can. D.C. 29 6 2421 2836 85.4
4. Ray Martin Philo, Ill. 513 29 6 2243 2780 80.7
5. Mark Seibold Huntington, Ind. 502 29 6 2528 3188 79.3
6. Glen Henton Maquoketa, Iowa 530 26 9 2447 3092 79.1
7. Al Stockholm Cortland, N.Y. 537 25 10 2267 2918 77.7
8. Frank Stinson Minneapolis, Minn. 525 25 10 2337 3022 77.3
9. Wilbur Kabel New Madison, Ohio 533 24 11 2235 2848 78.5
10. Paul Day Frankfort, Ind. 529 24 11 2380 3080 77.3
11. Al Zadroga Elizabeth, Pa. 520 24 11 2193 2842 77.2
12. Norm Rioux Montville, Conn. 496 24 11 2291 3016 76.0
13. Gerald Maison Warren, Mich. 507 23 12 2187 2874 76.1
14. Art Tyson New Haven, Conn. 499 23 12 2090 2780 75.2
15. Jim Knisley Bremen, Ohio 532 20 15 2370 3020 78.5
16. Glen Rime Dayton, Ohio 523 19 16 2106 2852 73.8
17. Charles Killgore Plattsburg, Mo. 502 18 17 2048 2812 72.8
18. John Rademacher Plain City, Fla. 504 17 18 2187 2980 73.4
19. Paul Focht Dayton, Ohio 524 17 18 2006 2758 72.7
20. Roger Norwood Knoxville, Tenn. 514 17 18 1999 2758 72.5
21. Ralph Maddox Poca, West Virginia 541 16 19 2115 2850 74.2
22. Dan Kuchcinski Bryant, Ind. 527 15 20 2180 2936 74.3
23. Clyde Martz Pittsburgh, Pa. 535 14 21 2121 2906 73.0
24. Joe Schultz Brentwood, N.Y. 491 13 22 1966 2756 71.3
25. Roger Vogel Denver, Colo. 515 13 22 2077 2916 71.2
26. Al Lord Mechanic Falls, Maine 498 12 23 1983 2770 71.6
27. Jim Solomon Uniontown, Pa. 493 12 23 1884 2696 69.9
28. Ansil Copeland Akron, Ohio 496 11 24 2024 2864 70.7
29. Gary Roberts Waverly, Ohio 532 11 24 1847 2634 70.1
30. Andy Paglarini Hibbing, Minn. 517 10 25 1741 2606 66.8
31. Clair Bruce New Castle,Pa. 515 8 27 1970 2804 70.3
32. Mark Freeman Lapeer, Mich. 503 7 28 1542 2414 63.9
33. Jerry Black Fargo, N.D. 498 5 30 1558 2492 62.5
34. Ron Jinkerson Selby, Ont., Can. 510 3 32 1304 2186 59.7
35. Ron Prue Haverville, Mass. 492 1 34 1261 2064 61.1
36. Curt Over Altoona, Pa. 520 Forfeit, withdrew after 32 games