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1973 World Tournament
Eureka, Cal. . July 28-Aug. 2, 1973

Permission granted by author, Gary T. Kline of
"The Official N.H.P.A. History of the World Tournament 1909-1980", Reflection Press, Dayton, Ohio
Gary T. Kline's book on past world tournament (before 1980) is recommended reading for any horseshoe pitching enthusiast. With his kind permission, we bring excerpts from his fabulous collection of data, to wit:

1973 World Tournament

California was again the chosen site for the World Tournament. For the first time, the World Tournament would be held indoors. An unforeseen problem occurred that year. Early on the second night of play, the lights went out! Once again it shows anything can happen at the big event and usually does.

Stewart M. Snyder of Cloverdale, Cal. wrote an excellent article that appeared in the News Digest about the blackout. The Little Cow Palace pavilion, on a different circuit, stayed lit, so the spectators and players partied there to the percussion music of "Red" Henton accompanied by his wife on the organ.

This tournament would be the swan song of legend Ted Allen, now but a shell of the great superstar that was horseshoe pitching's most reknowned Champion. Ted's final appearance was his 31st in the Championship Class, an all time high. Ted ranks no. 1 in World Tournament victories with 771 in 989 games, another record. Unfortunately, this author does not have game by game accounts for 1934, 1940, 1949, 1950, or 1954 so Ted's total of 80 percent, 85 percent, and 90 percent games cannot be accurately given. Ted's carreer ringer percentage is 79.46 with a qualifying average of 523 points.

Ted won the title ten times! His banner year was 1955. He threw a then-record 570 points qualifying and a tournament average of 86.3 percent, also his best, while winning 38 games without a loss! Ted, also that year, pitched every game over 80 percent, the only time in the World Tournament history this has been done. Ted still comes to World Tournments nearly every year. Ted's Allen Horseshoe is one of the very best shoes ever manufactured. Thank you, Ted Allen, for producing so many of horseshoe pitching's greatest moments!

Rookies numbered seven. Making their only top class appearance were Arthur Burch, Fred Lavett, James Burch, and William Henn. Jim would use this event as a springboard to take the State title from Bob West. Bill, the Kentucky champion, would exceed the accomplishment of his father, Harry, back in 1949. Elmer Harrison from the famed Southwestern District of Ohio was making his first appearance. Charles Killgore, a future State champ and Missouri Association President, was beginning a career that has him one appearance away from the Top 100. Norman Rioux, Connecticut champ, would make the Top 100, but would be bumped out in 1979.

After seven games only Hohl was unbeaten and enjoyed a one game lead over Kuchcinski who was 6-1. Ten men were tied for third place with 5-2 records: Tyson, Anthony, Copeland, Rioux, Focht, Henton, Rademacher, Kabel, West, and Seibold. Tyson lost to Simmons, 51-31 and Manker, 50-36. Copeland lost to Focht, 50-33 and Darnold, 51-45. Anthony lost to Seibold, 50-33 and Killgore, 50-35. Rioux lost to Stockholm, 51-40 and West, 50-45. Focht lost to Rademacher, 52-47 and Potts, 51-32. Henton lost to Latino, 51-42 and Kuchcinski, 50-42. Rademacher lost to Kabel, 51-15 and Toole, 54-41. Kabel lost to Hohl, 53-35 in 120 shoes and then to Krug, 50-31. West lost to Henton, 51-44 and Kabel, 50-21. Seibold lost to Stockholm, 50-35 in 120 shoes and later to Henn, 52-48 in 120 shoes. Mark lost to two fellow lefties. Kuchcinski was stunned by Rademacher, 51-19. In the opening game, World Champion Hohl (96.9 percent) welcomed a petrified rookie, Harrison, with a 54-1 massacre in only 32 shoes. Harrison next game upset Stinson, 52-41. Hohl (90 percent) cuffed Darnold, 51-12. West (92.6 percent) also measured Darnold, 51-12. Copeland edged Gonzales, 51-48 in 128 shoes. Jesse also lost to Krug, 51-48 and later fell to Hohl, 50-44 in 114 shoes. Knauft (90.9 percent) buried Harrison, 50-6.

After 14 games Hohl was still perfect. Tied at 12-2 were West and Seibold. At 11-3 were Rioux and Rademacher. Trailing at 10-4 were Potts, Kuchcinski, Vogel and Kabel. Hohl (92.8 percent) battered Riffle, 54-7. West (93.2 percent) murdered Killgore, 52-12. West smashed Pratt, 52-10 with 92.2 percent. Rioux was taken by Schneider, 52-41. Kuchcinski was beaten by West, 51-31; Hohl, 51-35; and took a shocking whipping from Copeland, 50-14. Kabel was dumped by Seibold, 5029 and Knisley, 50-46.

After 21 games Hohl still was without blemish. The only reasonable contenders were Seibold (19-2), West (18-3), and Rademacher (17-4). Seibold had now won 14 straight. West was jolted by Vogel, 53-34. Earlier, West (92 percent) drubbed the unfortunate Harrison, 55-7. Bob next thrashed Latino, 52-9 with 90.5 percent. Rademacher (90 percent) stomped Burch, 52-7, but later was tripped by Henton, 50-42. Hard luck Kabel lost four straight while being in the king row: 50-42 to Potts; 50-45 to Kuchcinski; 50-46 to Knauft in 128 shoes; and 52-49 to Rime in 132 shoes. Wilbur would lose seven games of this nature during the tournament. Henton was upset by Black, 51-49 Knisley edged Focht, 52-48. Vogel was nudged by Hohl, 50-43. Krug nipped Knisley, 50-49 in 128 shoes. Killgore ended a 10 game losing streak by beating Krug, 52-35. Simmons halted his 16 game skid by taking Pratt, 50-44. Pratt stopped a 15 game losing streak by whipping Burch, 52-19. Burke broke a 19 game losing streak by topping Darnold, 50-43.

After 28 games Hohl was still unbeaten, and only Seibold at 25-3 had a reasonable shot at the defending champion. Elmer (88.2 percent) was pushed to 144 shoes by Knauft (85.2 percent) before winning, 5039. Elmer looked invincible! Mark was beaten by Rademacher, 51-40 in 122 shoes. West lost to Stinson, 52-37 and Knisley, 52-42. Rademacher lost four more games to fade from contention. Vogel took Henton, 50-46 in 120 shoes. Focht nosed Schneider, 51-47 in 120 shoes. Knauft (93.1 percent) destroyed Simmons, 52-5. Allen ended an 11 game losing string by topping Stockholm, 50-46, for Ted's last World Tournament victory! Another all time great in his final meet was Floyd Toole. Toole ended his 11 game losing skein by trimming Focht, 53-42. Perhaps Floyd's greatest accomplishment was setting the World Record off our consecutive 90 percent games in 1965 when he finished third for his career best. Thank you, Floyd Toole, for your many magnificent contributions to horseshoe pitching on and off the courts!

In game 29 in a mild upset, Rime surprised Knauft, 50-35. Paul Focht stepped forward and struck down Hohl, 52-42! In game 30, Seibold outbattled Vogel, 52-34 in 142 shoes. In game 31, Pratt stopped a 14 game losing streak by beating Allen, 51-32. West (90.5 percent) shelled Schneider, 50-13. In game 32, Knauft beat Knisley, 50-34 in 122 shoes. In game 33, Harrison ended his 30 game losing streak by trimming Pratt, 50-45. Henton edged West, 50-47 in 122 shoes. Kabel (91.4 percent) hammered Toole, 50-9. Elmer Hohl in his effort to eliminate young Seibold pitched 81.6 percent for 114 shoes. This was nowhere near enough as Mark tossed 89.5 percent, his best game of the tournament, while trouncing Elmer, 52-27! In game 34, Kabel outlasted Stinson, 50-47 in 120 shoes. Hohl busted Schneider, 50-16 and Seibold held of Henton, 50-38. In game 35, Allen ended his career with 11 straight losses and 22 defeats in his last 23 games. Seibold handledSchneider, 51-33. Bob West rose to the occasion and upset Hohl by a convincing 50-34 score as Elmer failed in his attempt to clinch the World Title. Elmer would now have to face Seibold in a playoff to retain his coveted crown!

What a classic matchup: Hohl, the three-time World Champion, against Seibold, a two-time Junior Division World Champion. This playoff had virtually the same ingredients as 1933 when the young Allen dethroned the great C.C. Davis. In the first game, Hohl (83.7 percent) easily defeated the youngster, 52-27 in 92 shoes. (Elmer has historically met his stiffest challenge from those who pitch from the right side of the stake. The veteran Day is a good example. Young lefthanders, such as Kuchcinski and now Seibold, would always require a supreme effort.) In game two, Elmer with 82.4 percent for 108 shoes edged the strong-hearted Mark, 50-4.6 to retain the World Title! Elmer had joined Jackson, Davis, Allen, and Isais as men who have won four or more World Tournaments! Elmer became the seventh man to successfully defend the title as Jackson, Mossman, Davis, Allen, Isais, and Kuchcinski had done before!

For young Seibold, this had to boost his confidence for future tournaments! The N.H.P.A. also learned valuable information for conducting future World Tournaments indoors!


1973 World Tournament Eureka, Cal. . July 28-Aug. 2, 1973
QualW.L.R.Sp.Pet.
1. Elmer Hohl Wellesley, Ont., Can. D.C. 32 3 2248 2692 83.5
2. Mark Seibold Huntington, Ind. 552 32 3 2418 2988 80.9
3. Bob West Scappoose, Ore. 566 28 7 2293 2788 82.2
4. Wilbur Kabel New Madison, Ohio 510 25 10 2481 3096 80.1
5. John Rademacher Plant City, Fla. 525 25 10 2114 2732 77.4
6. Roger Vogel Denver, Colo. 523 25 10 3036 2712 75.1
7. Red Henton Maquoketa, Iowa 540 24 11 2405 3046 79.0
8. Paul Focht Dayton, Ohio 520 24 11 2088 2660 78.5
9. Jesse Gonzales Los Osos, Cal. 520 23 12 2304 2980 77.3
10. Norman Rioux Montville, Conn. 519 22 13 2240 2958 75.7
11. Dan Kuchcinski Bryant, Ind. 522 22 13 2128 2814 75.6
12. Al Stockholm Cortland, N.Y. 496 22 13 2126 2868 74.1
13. Joe Krug Yakima Wash. 496 22 13 1883 2660 70.8
14. Merlin Potts Leonardsville, Kansas 535 21 14 2221 2934 75.7
15. William Henn Bellevue, Ky. 511 21 14 2100 2825 74.3
16. Henry Knauft Spokane, Wash. 522 20 15 2253 2888 78.0
17. Jim Knisley Bremen, Ohio 532 20 15 2176 2906 74.9
18. Ansil Copeland Akron, Ohio 524 20 15 1651 2264 72.9
19. Harold Anthony Arcanum, Ohio 518 19 16 2118 2806 75.5
20. Jerry Schneider Cypress, Cal. 542 18 17 2080 2762 75.3
21. Frank Stinson Minneapolis, Minn. 516 17 18 1965 2732 71.9
22. Glen Rime Dayton, Ohio 487 17 18 1745 2524 69.1
23. Art Tyson New Haven, Conn. 516 16 19 1845 2648 69.7
24. Fred Lavett Seaside, Cal. 490 15 20 1876 2618 71.7
25. Charles Killgore Plattsburg, Mo. 490 14 21 1923 2674 71.9
26. Stanley Manker Martinsville, Ohio 529 13 21 1758 2562 68.6
27. Jerry Black Fargo,N.D. 509 13 22 1833 2600 70.5
28. Monte Latino Sacramento, Cal. 497 13 22 1720 2512 68.5
29. Harold Darnold Burlington, Iowa 493 9 26 1778 2628 67.7
30. Floyd Toole Little Rock, Ark. 508 9 26 1595 2432 65.8
31. James Burke Albany, Ore. 487 8 27 1586 2382 66.6
32. Ronnie Simmons Buena Park, Cal. 502 6 29 1526 2374 63.4
33. Arthur Burch Scottsburg, Ind. 512 5 30 1636 2498 65.5
34. Ted Allen Boulder, Colo. 488 4 31 1280 2194 58.3
35. Elmer Harrison Hamilton, Ohio 487 3 32 1392 2270 61.3
36. John Pratt Citrus Heights, Cal. 487 2 33 1385 2236 61.9
Elmer Hohl and Mark Seibold tied for the World Championship. There was a best two out-of-three game playoff in which Hohl won the first two games.
First game
Hohl 52 pts. 77 R. 92 SP. 83.7 Pet.
Seibold 27 pts. 70 R. 92 SP. 76.1 Pet.
Second game
Hohl 50 pts. 89 R. 108 SP. 82.4 Pet.
Seibold 46 pts. 88 R. 108 SP. 81.5 Pet.