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1972 World Tournament
Greenville, Ohio - July 29-Aug. 9, 1972


Permission granted by author, Gary T. Kline of
"The Official N.H.P.A. History of the World Tournament 1909-1980", Reflection Press, Dayton, Ohio
Gary T. Kline's book on past world tournament (before 1980) is recommended reading for any horseshoe pitching enthusiast. With his kind permission, we bring excerpts from his fabulous collection of data, to wit:

    In 1972, the tournament returned to the "Horseshoe Pitching Capital of the World," Greenville, Ohio. This was a beautiful time and place to spend a honeymoon. This year saw the final appearance of the great Harold Reno, 1961 and 1964 World Champion. It was here that Harold had won his second crown in a tremendous tournament.

    Qualifying is especially tense here, as no score seems to be safe around the 500 point area. Elmer Hohl racked up 569 points, nearly breaking his 1968 record. What a field, as it took a minimum of 502 points to make this showcase. State champions were all over the place: Day, West, Knauft, Kabel, Steinfeldt, Maison, Potts, Stinson, Carson, Monday and Maylahn. A special goodbye to the great Marines Tamboer in this, his final tournament. Thank you for the many exciting moments in your super career.

    This is for those who feel that each state should only send its Champion. Could you imagine Seibold, three time World Champion Kuchinski, Henton, Gonzales, Reno, Stockholm, Zagroga, Anthony, Bruce, Rademacher, past World Champion Focht, Copeland, Van Sant, Solomon, Manker, Tamboer, and Toole, all members of the all time top 100, staying home because of this restriction? Let's put that idea to rest forever! The NCAA Basketball Tournament was finally recognized the aforementioned truism. Some in the field would use this tournament as a springboard to a State Championship. They were Henton, Stockholm, Zadroga, Rademacher, Black and Maylahn.

    There was a fabulous cast of rookies. Stockholm would wrest the state title from the legendary Steinfeldt. Monday was now carrying the pride of Virginia as the great "Boo" Henson had done before. Tough Chet Reel had the experience of the great state of Indiana. Jerry Black was the dominant force from North Dakota. Maylahn was a terror in Wisconsin. Norwood was a great star of Tennessee. Art Tyson and Ted Harris would become the first blacks to qualify in the Championship Class. Art would become State Champion of Connecticut and later New York! Ted hailed from London, Ohio, where the creator of the Horseshoe World, Raymond B. Howard resided. Ted had the heart of a lion. Ted had vision in only one eye, yet he pitched better than most of us with two! Quite an accomplishment indeed. What would he have done with two good eyes?

    After seven games, Seibold, Kuchcinski, Hohl, and Day were unbeaten. Curt had now won 42 straight. Right behind at 6-1 were Potts, Steinfeldt, Stockholm, and West. Henton, Reno, and Kabel were 5-2. Wilbur had lost to Potts, 51-46 and Focht, 50-21. Harold had lost to Seibold, 55-38 and Hohl, 51-26. Bob's lone loss was to Seibold, 51-40.

    Alan fell to Reno, 51-25. Carl was tripped by Reno, 51-37. Merlin was handled by Kuchcinski, 50-28. Day (92 percent) blasted Maroni, 54-6. West (97.4 percent) mastered Solomon 51-15. West bounced Maroni, 53-10 with 90.9 percent. Steinfeldt (92.3 percent) shackled Van Sant, 54-10.

    After 14 games, just Day survived the upset–minded field. Curt now had 49 consecutive wins. Curt (92.2 percent) stomped Stinson, 52-9, but had to go 124 shoes to get by Knauft, 50-45. At 13-1 were West, Seibold, and Hohl. Seibold was whipped by Day 52-35. Mark earlier had upset Hohl, 51-49 in a thriller. Elmer, for the third time in his career pitched three straight games over 90 percent. The machine hit 90.7 percent to bury Potts, 52-4; then 92.7 percent for 124 shoes to subdue Toole, 50-17; and then 91.4 percent while hammering the hard-luck Maroni, 51-9. At 12-2 was Kuchcinski. Dan was nailed again by Knauft, 51-47 and shocked by Stinson, 52-35. Henton was 11-3. Glen fell to Seibold, 51-34 in 124 shoes. Glen outfought Reno, 52-44 in 128 shoes. At 10-4 were Carson, Steinfeldt, Stockholm, and Kabel. Dales's lone defeat was at the hands of Potts, 55-24. Carl was bruised by Maison, 50-24; Monday 51-21; and Harris, 51-33. Alan was dropped by Bruce, 50-28; edged by Van Sant, 50-49; and Solomon, 52-44. Wilbur nudged Rademacher, 50-46 in 120 shoes. Gonzales (86.0 percent) out-pitched Anthony (84.6 percent) in 150 shoes, 52-45. Knauft (91.9 percent) trampled Bruce 51-13. Reno lost to Kuchcinski, 50-45; then to Henton 52-44 in 128 shoes. Manker toppled Reno, 51-49. Day kicked Reno, 55-10. Henton bowed to Seibold, 51-34 in 124 shoes.

    After 21 games, Day remained perfect and now had a winning streak of 56 straight. Curt's hardest victory was 50-47 over Gonzales in 120 shoes. At 20-1 was Elmer Hohl. Hohl (91.1 percent) marched through Stinson, 51-16, and escaped Stockholm, 51-49 in 126 shoes. Also 20-1 was West.

    Bob (93.7 percent) bowled over Norwood, 51-9. Seibold was 19-2. Mark was surprised by Stinson, 53-31. At 18-3 was Kuchcinski. Dan was taken by West, 52-38. Earlier Dan (90.0 percent) throttled Black 52.9. Henton stayed in the hunt at 17-4. Glen's single defeat was to Day 51-32. Henton (93.5 percent) scorched Stinson, 50-21, Stinson upset Steinfeldt, 51-46 in 130 shoes. Bruce (90 percent) steamed past Manker, 50-19. Maison tripped Zadroga, 52-48 in 126 shoes. Zadroga nipped Reno, 52-48 in 122 shoes. Steinfeldt faded from contention with his four losses. Carl was nose by Potts, 51-48. Cart was manhandled by Anthony, 51-23 and Stockholm 50-27. Stockholm also faded with a hard loss to Seibold, 50-41. Earlier, Alan (91.9 percent) strode past Harris, 52-16. Kabel also faded. Wilbur was taken by Reno, 51-41. Later Kabel lost a 52-44 contest to Henton in 132 shoes.

    After 28 games, Day had run his unbeaten string to 63 in a row, only six away from Isais' all time record. Waiting in the shadows was Hohl at 27-1. Elmer (91.7 percent) massacred Tyson, 51-11. Elmer subdued West, 50-34 in 130 shoes. The hard pressed Elmer later took Rademacher, 51-28 in 120 shoes. At 25-3 was Seibold. Mark (90.9 percent) walloped Paglarini, 51-10. Next game Seibold was axed by Kuchcinski, 50-42. Staying alive at 24-4 were West and Kuchcinski. Bob slipped by Reno, 52-43 in 122 shoes, but tumbled to Steinfeldt, 51-33 and Day, 52-27. In another horseshoe pitching classic which last 144 shoes, Kuchcinski (86.1) was out mastered by Henton (87.5 percent) by a 51-43 score. Henton was taken by Steinfeldt, 52-38 in 134 shoes. Gonzales (90 percent) kicked Copeland, 52-13. Bruce outlasted Anthony, 50-43 in 122 shoes.

    In game 29 all six contenders won. In game 30, Hohl eliminated Henton, 52-41. Kuchcinski was upset by Stockholm, 50-25. Seibold survived Bruce, 50-47. Gonzales topped Maison, 52-49 in 124 shoes. In game 31, Stockholm edged Rademacher, 52-49 in 136 shoes. Hohl eliminated Kuchcinski, 51-44. In game 32, Kabel (82.6 percent) ended Day's winning streak of 66 games, 50-43 in 104 shoes, as Curt with 79.88 percent could not extinguish this challenge.

    Curt was now tied with Hohl with the dreaded trio of Steinfeldt, Kuchcinski, and Hohl still to face. In game 33, Hohl and Day posted easy victories and this eliminated West with Seibold no on the brink. Knauft (90.7 percent) blasted Paglarini, 55-10. In game 34, West lost his hold on third place after being stung by Stockholm, 54-43! Seibold, although winning his 11th straight game, was eliminated as Hohl trounced Kabel 51-20. Day collapsed to 74.4 percent while getting overwhelmed by Kuchinski, 50-26.

    If Elmer Hohl could beat Curt Day, a third crown would be his. Another dream finish was at hand. The legendary Curt Day had been on the verge of being the only man to win back to back World Tournaments undefeated, and break Isais' all time winning streak. He now trailed Hohl by a game! What a dramatic change of events. In game 35, Seibold (95.0 percent) nailed down third by bombarding Toole, 52-3! In the super match, Hohl hit 81.6 percent to barely get Curt's attention, as Curt (89.6 percent) walked over Elmer, 54-28 in 116 shoes.

    Horseshoe pitching would now enjoy its sixth playoff. In 1926, it was Frank Jackson over Putt Mossman. In 1933, Ted Allen bettered C.C. Davis. In 1940, Allen conquered Fernando Isais and Guy Zimmerman. In 1956, Allen bested Don Titcomb. In 1957, Allen topped Titcomb again. Every man who has ever appeared in a playoff had sometime in his career won the World Tournament. Perhaps this is fate's way of being kind.

    In 10 previous encounters, Day had won eight and Elmer two. For these ten confrontations which averaged 101 shoes, Day averaged 83.68 percent and Hohl 78.77 percent. In a crucial match, Day seems nerveless while Hohl has a tendency to chain smoke. With these incidentals mentioned, let us continue with the playoff which was not concluded until the wee hours of the morning.

    In game one, Elmer, puffin' away, defeated Curt, 52-42 in 112 shoes. Elmer tossed 83.9 percent while Curt hit 81.3 percent. In game two, the determined Curt fired a superb 90.2 percent to handcuff a non-smoking Elmer, 55-24 in 92 shoes. There was another rest break after game two so the courts could be worked, and to allow the pitchers and spectators a breather.

    During this break, a young student of the game asked Elmer why he didn't light up while Curt was stringing double after double. Elmer explained that he had run out of cigarettes. The you honeymooner, apparently the only one on the grounds to notice, gave Elmer a handful. In game three, Elmer (89.8 percent) ran off with the Championship, have an easy 51-17 victory.

    Off the courts, the very intelligent Rollin Futrell became the third Ohioan to win the Arch Stokes Memorial Trophy. Rollin joined Ottie Reno from 1964 and long time Ohio President and N.H.P.A. Vice President Leo McGrath from 1969. Rollin has the talent to run a tournament so smoothly it's as if the event takes care of itself. The sport of horseshoe pitching presents man opportunities in the administrative field to those who have a willingness for hard work. It is due to the sacrifice of unsung heroes like Rollin Futrell that this sport continues to grow stronger.


1972 World Tournament
Greenville, Ohio - July 29-Aug. 8, 1972
Qual. W. L.   R. Sp. Pct.
1. Elmer Hohl Wellesey, Ont., Can. 569 33 2 2619 3044 86.0
2. Curt Day Frankfort, Ind. D.C. 33 2 2238 2732 83.6
3. Mark Seibold Huntington, Ind. 527 32 3 2502 3058 81.8
4. Bob West Scappoose, Ore 538 30 5 2460 2948 83.4
5. Dan Kuchcinski Bryant, Ind. 558 29 6 2472 3022 81.8
6. Glen Henton Maquoketa, Iowa 536 28 7 2605 3116 83.6
7. Jesse Gonzales Los Osos, Cal. 521 26 9 2438 3016 80.8
8. Harold Reno Sabino, Ohio 510 25 10 2436 3060 79.6
9. Henry Knauft Spokane, Wash. 503 23 12 2325 2878 80.8
10. Wilbur Kabel New Madison, Ohio 548 23 12 2274 2942 77.3
11. Alan Stockholm Cortland, N.Y. 528 22 13 2357 3030 77.8
12. Carl Steinfeldt Rochester, N.Y. 559 21 14 2477 3168 78.2
13. Al Zadroga Elizabeth, Pa. 548 20 15 2248 2906 77.3
14. Harold Anthony Arcanum, Ohio 508 19 16 2341 3016 77.6
15. Gerald Maison Warren Mich. 526 19 16 2204 2862 77.0
16. Merlin Potts Leonardville, Kans 506 19 16 2177 2912 74.8
17. Clair Bruce New Castle, Pa. 516 18 17 2480 3176 78.1
18. Frank Stinson Minneapolis, Minn. 512 17 18 2350 3090 76.1
19. John Rademacher Plant City, FLa. 538 16 19 2346 3036 77.3
20. Paul Focht Dayton, Ohio 515 15 20 2030 2764 73.4
21. Dale Carson Baltimore, Md. 550 14 21 2156 2914 74.0
22. Ansil Copeland Akron, Ohio 524 14 21 1867 2577 72.4
23. Cecil Monday Richmond, Va. 512 13 22 1969 2732 72.1
24. Karl Van Sant Cayuga, Ind. 521 13 22 2003 2780 72.1
25. Chet Reel West Middleton, Ind. 505 13 22 2069 2880 71.8
26. Jim Solomon Uniontown, Pa. 522 11 24 2079 2860 72.7
27. Stan Manker Martinsville, Ohio 523 11 24 2042 2814 72.6
28. Jerry Black Fargo, N.D. 502 10 25 1828 2610 70.0
29. Marines Tamboer Wichita, Kansas 534 10 25 1834 2620 70.0
30. Floyd Toole Little Rock, Ark. 527 9 26 1987 2796 71.1
31. Art Tyson New Haven, Conn. 522 9 26 1978 2819 70.2
32. Ralph Maylahn Milwaukee, Wis. 518 9 26 1802 2598 69.4
33. Roger Norwood Knoxville, Tenn. 511 9 26 1825 2636 69.2
34. Ted Harris London, Ohio 510 7 28 1903 2744 69.4
35. Andy Paglarini Hibbing, Minn. 506 7 28 1858 2702 68.8
36. Rich Maroni Arnold, Pa. 505 3 32 1520 2412 63.0

Elmer Hohl and Curt Day tied for World Champion. There was a best two out of three game playoff in which Hohl won the first and third games.
Playoff Summary
W. L.  R. Sp. Pct.
Hohl . . . . 2 1 255 302 84.4
Day . . . . 1 2 250 302 82.78