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1960 World Tournament
Muncie, Ind. - Aug. 1-9, 1960

Permission granted by author, Gary T. Kline of
"The Official N.H.P.A. History of the World Tournament 1909-1980", Reflection Press, Dayton, Ohio
Gary T. Kline's book on past world tournament (before 1980) is recommended reading for any horseshoe pitching enthusiast. With his kind permission, we bring excerpts from his fabulous collection of data, to wit:

   In the 1959 N.H.P.A. convention, the delegates decided that for the advancement of the sport a change of venue was in order. Therefore the beautiful Heekin Park courts in Muncie, Indiana would now be the new tournament site.
   Qualifying scores in Muncie were extraordinary with 25 men crashing the magic 500 plateau! Twenty-four veterans qualified for this event. With Reno, Dugle, Titcomb, Tate, Day, Steinfeldt, Focht, Toole, Tamboer, Johnson, Lindmeier, Standard, and the incomparable Allen, anything was possible! As 1959 was a sub par year for rookies, 1960 would be one of the most exceptional of all time!

   Headed for the top 100 was Marvin Cragi. Headed to the top 20 of all time were Ray Martin, Ralph Maddox, and Elmer Hohl. It is said that when Elmer first beat the Canadian legend, Dean McLaughlin, that Dean himself had to report to the scorer's table to confirm that the scorekeeper had not made a mistake!

   It is rumored that one day on an outing, some Canadians wanted to set up some pegs but had no tape measure. Elmer pitched a shoe with the exact center of his shoe to be used as the forty foot distance. Legend says that when the tape measure arrived the pegs were less than an inch off! Elmer pitches a hard driving 1 3/4 turn. Ray Martin's 1 3/4 had much the appearance of a beautiful butterfly while encircling the peg. Ralph Maddox used a rocking chair motion to toss his 1 3/4. When Ralph was on his rocker, opponents were in trouble.

   After seven games the undefeated were Allen, Titcomb, Day, Focht, Reno. Hohl took a beating from Rogers, 55-36. McFatridge fell to Tamboer, 51-37. In the seventh game Hohl pounded Reno 53-33 in 120 shoes. Titcomb (90.0) slaughtered Standard 52-7. Steinfeldt (91.9 percent) trounced Johnson, 52-8. Reno (94.1 percent) mistreated Craig, 51-2. Ohler walloped Martin 50-14.

   After 14 games only Allen survived the attack on the leaders. Ted (14-0) had extended his latest winning streak to 50! Tied at 13-1 were Hohl and Titcomb. Don's lone loss was to Reno, 50-46. In a huge deadlock for fourth place at 12-2 were Day, Maddox, Reno, and Toole. Alone at 11-3 was Focht and at 10-4 were Steinfeldt and Brumfield. In feature matches of the day, Curt Day was drubbed by Reno, 50-19; and by Focht, 50-28 in games 13 and 14. Maddox went down to Hohl, 51-45, 84.2 percent not being good enough in this 108 shoe match. Reno received a trundling from Steinfeldt, 51-31. Toole (83.0 percent) fell to Reno, 50-33 in 108 shoes. Floyd took a 50-15 pasting from Maddox. Focht took a licking from Hohl, 52-27 in 114 shoes. Paul was immediately upset by Dixon, 52-44. Focht later lost to Toole, 51-41. Ohler was nipped by Maddox, 51-48 in 116 shoes. Steinfeldt, while pitching 80 percent each time, was tripped by Focht, 51-33 and Maddox, 51-49. In a very exciting down to the wire marathon which lasted 148 shoes, Allen escaped the ambush prepared by Brumfield, 51-48! In an earlier match of 128 shoes, Gene tangled with Titcomb and finally lost 55-42.

   At the end of 21 games with some surprising results, Don Titcomb now led the tournament. Don was absolutely fabulous while upping his record to 20-11 Don (90.2 percent) winning 53-23 over tough Maddox. Don (94.6 percent) giving a severe lacing to veteran Lindmeier. In between games, Don was forced to 114 shoes to take McFatridge, 53-46. Tied for second were Hohl and Allen at 19-2. In the shocker of the day, Ted Allen saw his 51 game winning streak go down the drain. Terry Earley had the game of his career, pitching 86.0 percent for 136 shoes while dumping Allen, 51-45. Allen fell short in a bid to maintain a share of the lead, bowing to Hohl, 53-47. Elmer in his preceding match lost to Ohler, 50-43. So Elmer Hohl, a rookie, upset World Champion Ted Allen to remain in the thick of the race. Tied for fourth place were Day, Maddox and Reno at 18-3. Even for seventh place were Focht and Steinfeldt at 17-4. In some other big matches Reno was upset by Jensen, 51-36, Maddox measured Day, 50-41, Steinfeldt easily won seven straight and Focht was blasted by Titcomb, 50-12.

   After 28 games Titcomb moved into command at 27-1. Only a complete collapse could stop him now. In a five way tie for second at 24-4 were Day, Steinfeldt, Maddox, Allen, and Reno. Hohl finished the day losing three straight. Losses were to Steinfeldt, 51-48; Day, 52-44; and Titcomb, 50-34 in 120 shoes. Titcomb had his highest percentage game in his World Tournament career with an immortal 97.7 percent while shutting out great veteran Marines Tamboer, 51-0! Day was upset by Early, 50-47 in 112 shoes. Steinfeldt again won all seven with ease. Maddox was toppled by the tough Brumfield, 52-45 in 138 shoes. Allen stumbled through a 62.5 percent game, falling to Taylor, 53-38 and later to Toole, 50-38 in 112 shoes.

   In the 28th game, Reno was subdued, 50-30 by Focht in 114 shoes. In the 30th game, Reno was thumped by Maddox, 50-29 in 108 shoes. Giving the chasers hope was Titcomb's upset by Kelso, 51-49 in 118 shoes. In the 31st game, Reno fell from the race by a 51-38 setback to McFatridge. In a battle of contenders, Allen stopped Steinfeldt 16 game winning streak, 51-46. Maddox hopes were dashed by Focht, 52-49 in 106 shoes. Titcomb (85.5 percent) courageously struggled by Toole, 50-49, in 138 shoes. In the 32 nd game, Titcomb (93.7 percent) took a giant step closer, whipping Fulton, 51-13. Steinfeldt bowed out by losing to Day, 50-20. Maddox made an exit after losing a hard fought 50-44 game to Allen in 136 shoes. In the 33 rd game, in a survival match, Day held off Allen, 50-46 in 120 shoes. Meanwhile the eliminated Steinfeldt pitched 87.5 percent against Titcomb in one of the greatest matches in history. Titcomb in this 176 shoe affair pitched 88.6 percent to win 55-47 - a very fine performance for one under the pressure of championship aspirations. Now only Titcomb and Day were still alive.

   In game 34, Don locked up the title by turning back Day, 53-44 in 114 shoes. In game 35, Hohl sneaked back into second by beating Brumfield, 50-36. Titcomb, the new World Champion, proved his worthiness by beating the old champion Allen, 51-26 in 124 shoes. In winning the Championship, Don had dispelled the myth that a left hander could not win the World Tournament. Don had finally found that thrilling moment he has been seeking since 1947! Still to be altered was the California connection which has lasted since 1933. Don, who has always taken a strong forward path for the advancement of the sport, had finally walked to his just reward!

   The 176 shoe Titcomb-Steinfeldt match broke the 1957 single game record of 174 shoes by Allen and Day. Titcomb's 156 ringers broke Allen's record of 155. Titcomb's 69 doubles equalled another record. The combined total of 310 ringers equalled still another record.

   Records were established in the complete tournament category. Titcomb's total of 1033 doubles and Allen's 2966 shoes pitched were new records. Titcomb, Allen, Day, Maddox, Steinfeldt, and Hohl broke the ringer mark of 2261 previously held by Allen.


1960 World Tournament Summary
1960 World Tournament Muncie, Ind. - Aug. 1-9, 1960
Qual W. L. R. SP. Pct.
1 Don Titcomb Los Gatos, Cal. 557 33 2 2443 2878 84.9
2 Elmer Hohl Ontario, Canada 513 30 5 2280 2836 80.4
3 Curtis Day Frankfort, Ind. 545 30 5 2215 2738 80.9
4 Carl Steinfeldt Rochester, N.Y. 538 28 7 2330 2842 82.0
5 Gene Brumfield Markleville, Ind., 501 28 7 2251 2782 80.9
6 Ralph Maddox Poca, West Virginia 541 28 7 2337 2894 80.8
7 Ted Allen Boulder, Colo. D.C. 28 7 2381 2966 80.3
8 Harold Reno Sabina, Ohio 534 28 7 2094 2632 79.6
9 Paul Focht Dayton, Ohio 537 28 7 2221 2868 77.4
10 Floyd Toole Pine Bluff, Ark. 522 26 9 2209 2778 79.5
11 Jim Ohler Scotsdale, Pa. 510 23 12 2207 2832 77,.9
12 Graydon McFatridge Rushville, Ind. 547 22 13 2241 2826 79.3
13 Terry Earley New York City 506 20 15 2150 2860 75.2
14 Marines Tamboer Wichita, Kansas 503 20 15 2065 2782 74.2
15 Kenneth Jensen St. Joseph, Mich. 497 20 15 1946 2636 73.8
16 John Lindmeier Broadview, Ill. 487 17 18 1720 2426 70.9
17 Dale Dixon Des Moines, Iowa 517 16 19 1794 2510 71.5
18 Loren Crooks E. Fultonham, Ohio 489 16 19 1669 2374 70.3
19 Milton Tate Salt Lake City, Utah 505 15 20 1969 2714 72.5
20 Earl Winston Lamonte, Mo. 498 15 20 1781 2532 70.3
21 Wilbur Kelso Loogootee, Ind. 520 14 21 2042 2800 72.9
22 Francis Rogers Waverly, Iowa 508 14 21 1870 2620 71.4
23 Earl Wiges Exira, Iowa 511 14 21 1753 2492 70.3
24 Truman Standard Canton, Ill. 487 14 21 1736 2492 69.7
25 John Fulton Carlisle, Pa. 537 13 22 1849 2642 70.0
26 Wellington Taylor Grand River, Iowa 514 12 23 1893 2662 71.1
27 Raymond Martin Philo, Ill. 521 12 23 1746 2480 70.4
28 Ron Cherrier Hopkins, Minn 520 12 23 1866 2688 69.4
29 Frank Palka Chicago, Ill. 491 12 23 1701 2480 68.6
30 John Coble Peru, Ind. 487 12 23 1720 2556 67.3
31 Ernie Recht Ft. Wayne, Ind. 500 10 25 1484 2364 62.8
32 Marvin Craig Parker, Ind. 501 6 29 1657 2460 67.4
33 Jim Johnson Covington, Ky 498 6 29 1632 2472 66.0
34 Art Dugle Chicago, Ill. 488 3 32 1145 1978 57.9
35 Marlon Lange Bondurant, Iowa 498 2 33 1289 2140 60.2
36 James Kemple Rushville, Ind. 490 0 35
Forfeited