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1959 World Tournament
Murray, Utah - July 22-29, 1959

Permission granted by author, Gary T. Kline of
"The Official N.H.P.A. History of the World Tournament 1909-1980", Reflection Press, Dayton, Ohio
Gary T. Kline's book on past world tournament (before 1980) is recommended reading for any horseshoe pitching enthusiast. With his kind permission, we bring excerpts from his fabulous collection of data, to wit:

1959 World Tournament

With Murray, Utah, again hosting, the tournament returned to a 36 man round robin for the first time since 1953. Once again Fernando Isais, much to the disappointment of the gathering, did not defend his title. The spectators would still be treated to viewing superstars Ted Allen and Don Titcomb in their heralded battle for supremacy.

A super showman, Ted Allen was in the midst of his prime. Don Titcomb, when in the groove, was as talented as any man who ever pitched a shoe! There were 25 veterans in this field. Although great in their own right, at this particular juncture in time they were still paying their dues. Eleven rookies, an unusually high number for Murray, saturated this strong field. Only four would ever qualify for the championship class again. They were Jensen, Early, Mendenhall, and young Gary Farnsworth, who was forced to withdraw due to illness. The Southwestern district of Ohio was fast becoming the hottest spot in the world for pitching with all five Ohioans coming from this small area on the national map.

After seven games an unprecedented number of contestants were undefeated. The magnificent seven were Allen, Titcomb, Tate, Wahlin, Day, Reno, and Weeks. At only one loss were Dugle, Toole, Knauft and Elkins. A tremendous beginning for the followers of the ancient art. In the opening game, Don Titcomb served notice to the field by brilliantly stroking a 95.5 percent masterpiece on rookie Morse, winning 51-1. Allen (90.0 percent) rolled over Parsons, 51-7. Curt Day (90.0 percent) twice flashed his credentials to Winston, 51-16, and to Giles, 52-6.

After ]4 games, Allen, Titcomb, Tate, and Reno were all 14-0. Wahlin was next at 13-1. Weeks ran the gauntlet and fell four times, being 11 victim of Elkins, 55-43; Wahlin, 50-48; Allen, 55-19; and Day, 50-26. Day Suffered three losses, going down to Toole, 51-41; Dugle, 509 in one of his worst performances ever; and to Focht, 51-40. Wahlin's lone setback came against Tate, 52-31. Reno (91.2 percent) slaughtered his friend Manker, 51-2. Titcomb (91.2 percent) mercilessly shut out Glass, 53-0. Ted Allen was Superman these seven games. His highs, were 95.0 percent in a 51-6 romp over Cherrier; 92.6 pounding Dugle, 51-12; and 90.1 against the very game Weeks who forced the issue to 112 shoes! In his low game, Ted only averaged 85.1 percent taking Toole 50-40 on a hard fought match lasting 108 shoes. Ted averaged 89.1 percent for these seven games!

After 21 games only Allen and Titcomb remained undefeated. Right behind were Reno (20-1). Tate (19-2) with Toole and Wahlin at 18-3. Toole won all seven games. Wahlin fell to Reno, 50-43 in 132 shoes and tumbled to Wolfe, 50-31 in a colossal upset. Tate took a beating from Allen, 50-9 and then from Day, 55-43 in 100 shoes. In game 15 the stubborn Reno received his first loss to Allen, 52-44 in 118 shoes. Next game Harold held off Day, 52-49 in 110 shoes. Next match Harry Morse was abused again as Reno hit 94.7 percent in a 52-1 breather.

After 28 games those still in serious contention were Allen (28-0), Reno (27-1), Titcomb (26-2), and Tate (26-2). Titcomb in his fall from the top had a most disappointing day. In game 23 he lost a heartbreaker, 50-49, with Toole in 116 shoes. In game 25 Don lost a close decision to Dugle, 50-46. The other leaders were never seriously challenged the entire set. Art Dugle's 92.7 percent while defeating Dixon, 50-3, was the high percentage game. Ken Jensen scored 40 points on Allen.

The final day Tate went down hard to Toole, 50-41; Dugle, 52-48; and Reno, 52-43 to tumble to fifth place. The match with Dugle went 124 shoes. His battle with Reno went 122 shoes. Titcomb (91.1 percent) hammered Focht, 52-15. Don with 90.1 percent brushed aside Day, 5022. Titcomb still dropped to fourth by losing three of his last four. Don fell to Allen, 53-48 in 100 shoes; Tate, 51-27; and Reno, 50-37 in 130 shoes. Art Dugle, the one man wrecking crew for contenders, finished very strong for third place. Art won his final 16 games and 22 of his last 23. In long final day matches, he slipped by Tate, 52-48 in 124 shoes; Reno, 54-49 in 128 shoes; and Wolfe, 53-46 in 126 shoes. Harold Reno in his best showing to date had the high game of 91.7 percent with Dixon being the victim, 52-3. Allen shut out poor Morse, 53-01

The great legend of Ted Allen had annexed a phenomenal 10th World Championship. This was the third time Ted had won while being undefeated! Ted is the only man in World Tournament history to twice go unbeaten in a 36 man group. By all know records available, Ted in game 23 (a 50-5 romp over Carlberg) became the winningest pitcher in World Tournament history with his 518th win. This passed Frank Jackson's record which had lasted since 1935! Until 1933, all official champions either came from Kansas, Iowa or Ohio. From 1933 every champion had a California connection! Ted had also competed in every World event since 1933! If the missing game by game accounts of other years would ever be discovered, they would only add proof as to why Ted Allen is considered by so many to be the greatest horseshoe pitcher who ever lived!


1959 World Tournament Murray, Utah - July 22-29, 1959
QualW.L.R.Sp.Pet.
1.Ted AllenBoulder, Colo.5203501799213284.4
2.Harold RenoSabina, Ohio5423321938237681.6
3.Art DugleChicago, Ill.5083141809235876.7
4.Don TitcombLos Gatos, Cal.5473051811219082.7
5.Milton TatePeoria, Ill.5223051854235678.7
6.Clive WahlinSalt Lake City, Utah5113051787227278.7
7.Floyd ToolePine Bluff, Ind.5402871742216680.4
8.Curt Day Frankfort, Ind5402871742216680.4
9.Paul FochtDayton, Ohio51925101710234073.1
10.Jim WeeksNorwalk, Cal.51024111753238673.5
11.Henry KnauftSpokane, Wash.50923121544217271.1
12.Ron CherrierHopkins, Minn.47921141705241670.6
13.Dale DixonDes Moines, Iowa48921141541223269.0
14.Ken JensenSt. Joseph, Mich.48120151598231469.1
15.John ElkinsNeosho, Mo.50419161557231867.2
16.John PaxtonOttumwa, Iowa49119161485224666.1
17.Ray OhmsSalt Lake City, Utah47719161522232865.4
18.Jerry SchneiderMontebello, Cal.44618171530231066.2
19.Carl DavisProvo, Utah45017181494234663.7
20.Irwin CarlbergGrand Rapids, Mich.45914211500228065.8
21.Harold WolfeCedarville, Ohio44714211487232464.0
22.Terry EarlyNew York City46213221494228065.5
23.Clarence GilesRiverton, Utah45413221341215062.4
24.Gene MendenhallNoblesville, Ind.46313221316212661.9
25.Leonard GlassXenia, Ohio45113221124200456.1
26.Clint MooreCrawfordsville, Ind.47212231154198258.2
27.Roger ParsonsMidvale, Utah45121241215205059.3
28.Henry FisherCompton, Cal.44510251407225062.5
29.Stan MankerMartinsville, Ohio4739261200206858.0
30.Henry HarperMonterey Park, Cal.4378271168203857.3
31.Earl WinstonLamonte, Mo.4458271083190057.0
32.Carl LundgrenDetroit, Mich.4498271113199455.8
33.Nelson VogelManito, Ill.4468271011182855.3
34.Harry MorseSouth Gate, Cal.4333321104199655.3
35.Gary FarnsworthPotomac, Ill.476 Forfeited due to illness
36.Al DeVriesSacramento, Cal.440 Forfeited