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1922 WORLD TOURNAMENT
ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. - FEB. 20-24, 1922

Permission granted by author, Gary T. Kline of
"The Official N.H.P.A. History of the World Tournament 1909-1980", Reflection Press, Dayton, Ohio
Gary T. Kline's book on past world tournament (before 1980) is recommended reading for any horseshoe pitching enthusiast. With his kind permission, we bring excerpts from his fabulous collection of data, to wit:

1922 World Tournament (Winter)

Once again Frank Jackson did not undertake the defense of his World Title, creating a new legend in his absence. Of this 22 man group, only seven had prior World Tournament experience.

Heading these seven was 1919 champion Fred M. Brust, along with veterans Snyder, Fauble, Mallory and Ogden. Also included were Tom Miller, 1920 last place finisher whose efforts earned him a new derby as the consolation prize, and second choice of the betting crowd, 28year-old rotund Ralph Spencer in his second chase of the title.

The newcomers who would walk away with winning records were Feasel, Ritchey, Scott, Butler and Robinson. C. C. Davis was the favorite and brightest star on the scene. Davis earned the favorite's spot by defeating past World Champions in exhibition matches.

Horseshoe pitching was also blessed by the arrival of D. D. Cottrell, who was to become one of our greatest officers as well as historian. "Tiny" Maxwell himself was to cover the event for the newspaper media. "Tiny" predicted this tournament would boil down to Davis or Spencer.

After E. C. Beach conducted opening ceremonies, John Lodwick, World Tournament Publicity Manager, placed his new straw Mackin hat on the stake. He then dared Mayor Frank Fortune Pulver, whose attire included white shoes and straw hat, to hit it. Of four shoes thrown, 18 inches was as close as he got.

First day undefeated were Brust, Davis, Moore, Ritchey and Spencer. The second day left only Davis and Spencer untarnished. Key matches had Brust going down to Davis 50-37 in a game that was closer than the score indicated. George Snyder was at it again, knocking off Ritchey and Moore 50-38 and 50-31, respectively.

At the end of day three, Davis and Spencer remained tied with no losses. Davis won all of his with ease. Spencer had to make a miraculous comeback to get by Brust, trailing 32-19 and then hopelessly down 47-31. At 47-34, Spencer had to top a double to stay alive. At 49-49, Spencer threw a ringer and close point. Brust's first shoe cancelled the ringer, but his second could not beat the shoe touching the peg letting Spencer escape 50-49.

As had become Dr. Beach's trademark, he saved his unbeatens for the last game. Spencer had early 5-0 and 9-5 leads only to have Davis count back to back doubles for a 17-9 lead. Davis was never to be headed again in the 62-shoe match. Thus, carpenter Charles Clyde Davis defeated grocery store owner Ralph Spencer for the first of his World Championships.

When these men finally had thrown their last shoes in their illustrious careers, Davis had 411 confirmed wins, good for sixth place and Spencer had 183 confirmed wins, good for 33rd place on the all time World Tournament victory list!

When tied in games, place was decided by the highest number of points. Every man played every man one 50-point game. Winners and place decided by games won and lost. Total average number of ringers per 50-point game made by both players was 31.2. Tournament was held under the auspices of the local Board of Trade on the sandy loam courts of the Sunshine Pleasure Club in Williams Park, St. Petersburg, Fla., and sanctioned by the National League of Horseshoe and Quoit Pitchers.


1922 WORLD TOURNAMENT ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. - FEB. 20-24, 1922
MEN'S CHAMPIONSHIPS
W. L. R. DR.
1. C. C. DAVIS COLUMBUS, OHIO21 0 448106
2. RALPH SPENCER PICHER, OKLA. 20 1 46191
3. FRED BRUSTCOLUMBUS, OHIO 18 3 45776
4. JOHN W. FEASEL COLUMBUS, OHIO 16 5 35954
5. R. F. RICHEY ERIE, PA. 15 6 37649
6. J. G. SCOTT YPSILANTI, MICH. 13 8 35436
7. GEORGE E. SNYDER ALBION, ILL. 12 9 33438
8. J. S. BUTLER COLUMBUS, OHIO 12 9 31037
9. HARRY ROBINSONST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 11 10 33227
10. C. E. FAUBLE CLEVELAND, OHIO 11 10 33634
11. C. E. MALLERY WADSWORTH, OHIO 10 11 36440
12. PARKER MOORE CHICAGO, ILL. 10 11 30528
13. CHARLES ASPLINCLEVELAND, OHIO9 12 29033
14. J. W. OGDEN KANSAS CITY, MO. 8 13 27322
15. T. C. REED MCKEESPORT, PA. 8 13 32433
16. D. P. BLANEY ANAMOSA, IOWA 8 13 27528
17. D. D. COTTRELL COHOCTON, N.Y. 8 13 27323
18. JAMES F. FRANCISCOCOLUMBUS, OHIO 6 15 31125
19. WILLIAM GREEN GRUVER, IOWA 6 15 26124
20. TOM M. MILLER AKRON, OHIO 5 16 28331
21. E. L. COLE GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.3 18 27221
22. W. E. BEIER AKRON, OHIO1 20 22719
TOTALS 231 231 7225 875
When these men finally had thrown their last shoes in their illustrious careers, Davis had 411 confirmed wins, good for sixth place and Spencer had 183 confirmed wins, good for 33rd place on the all time World Tournament victory list!